Kids’ Allowances: What Rules and How Much to Pay?

Some interesting allowance statistics:

While these general guidelines are helpful, most parents still have lots of questions about allowances. Of course, there’s no single, “right” way to structure your child’s allowance. However, these tips might help you decide what works best for your family:

When should I start giving my kid an allowance?

Most parents start around age 8, according to a T.Rowe Price survey. This is a good rule-of-thumb age. One tip: If your child mixes in cash and coins with her toys or routinely leaves money sitting around the house, she’s not yet ready for an allowance.

How often should I give it?

Weekly for younger kids and allowance beginners. They’ll have trouble making their money last much longer than seven days. Switch to giving your kids a monthly allowance when they’re about 11. This requires them to budget their money over a longer amount of time.

How much should I pay?

Although the current U.S. average is $67.80/month, that’s for kids of all ages. Your mileage may vary. For instance, you may want to pay a dollar or so per year of a child’s age, and give raises at every birthday. By high school, you might prefer to give your teen enough money to cover his own costs for clothing, personal supplies, bus, etc. You can base the amount on how much money you think is reasonable for your child to spend, rather than just his or her age.

Should I tie allowance to chores or grades?

There are different schools of thought on this.

  • Tie to chores, yes: Some parents advocate paying kids “commissions” so money remains connected to working hard.
  • Tie to chores, no: Kids could decide to skip chores if they don’t need money.
  • Pay for grades, yes: This practice can teach kids that good work leads to rewards.
  • Pay for grades, no: It could take away their sense of pride, or be tricky for kids who truly struggle academically.

Should saving and/or donating be part of the allowance picture?

Most experts say definitely yes on this point. Give kids jars, envelope, segmented piggy banks or help them set up digital budget categories for Spend, Donate and Save. Older kids might also need bank accounts or digital categories for saving larger amounts of money—for a car, college, etc. Your goal is simply to help your kids see that money is never just for spending.

(photo courtesy © James Thompson cc2.0)

Allowance: When? How much? What for?

To give or not to give allowance, that is the question (and sometimes a controversial question at that). As piggy banks become obsolete and the need for physical cash dwindles in today’s fast-paced society, one thing hasn’t changed: the call of a child saying, “Hey Mom, I need money.” Whether parenting a 7-year-old or a 16-year-old, chances are pretty high that the A word (yes, allowance) is going to come up.

According to a T. Rowe Price survey, 51% of parents give their kids allowance. While the decision about whether or not to give allowances, the frequency of giving allowance and the amount of money that a child should receive for allowance can be highly personal to each family. 54% of parents who give allowance firmly believe it should be earned. 

Greenlight mom Maggy Parker shared, “I have always viewed allowance as a right of passage for my children. When the kids are old enough to take on regular responsibilities around the house, they are old enough to earn an allowance for their contribution.”

With age comes wisdom (and more allowance money) 

One of the most frequently asked questions about allowance focuses on what age is the best to start handing over money. While there are no official rules when it comes to allowance and each family is different, age 8 is the reported national average.  

Here’s a breakdown of what Greenlight kids average each week (ages 8-18): 

“I set my child’s weekly allowance after researching what the national average for allowance was and then cushioned it by a few dollars to ensure I was giving my son a little extra for his needs now that he’s driving,” said Greenlight mom Eliza Newell. 

Cha-ching, cha-chores! 

According to the most recent survey from the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, four in five parents who give allowance expect their kids to work for money. and their kids average about five hours a week of household chores. 

With the majority of parents expect their kids to earn allowance, chores often factor in as a stairway to an allowance pay out — however, this can look different for different families. 

Some families expect a completed chore list for an allowance pay out. If the lawn isn’t raked, the Lego’s aren’t put away, the bathroom trash isn’t taken out and the reading log for the week isn’t filled out, no allowance gets paid. 

Other families assign specific dollar amounts to chores, so if the child only completes five of their eight chores for the week – they don’t get the total allowance amount, just what each task equaled. 

Greenlight dad Allen Anderson shared that he gives his daughter a baseline allowance every week, but he gives her the opportunity to earn more on a weekly basis by doing more chores. 

Allowance leads to smart habits

Greenlight kids who receive allowance save 26% more and donate 37% more money than those who don’t. This suggests that allowance, paired with parental guidance, leads to healthy financial habits.

Payouts made easy

When it comes to paying out allowance, it shouldn’t be complicated. Since remembering to get cash back at the grocery store or finding an ATM is a hassle, Greenlight has made it easier on parents by offering an auto-funding option.

Parents can set weekly or monthly allowance payments tied to chores within the Greenlight app, so funds can be easily distributed. 

To encourage good habits, parents can also allocate those allowances to their kids’ Spend, Save and Give accounts. 

Try Greenlight now

Sign up your family for Greenlight today! 

Greenlight Raises $54 Million to Empower Parents to Raise Financially-Smart Kids

Today, we announced $54 million in Series B funding. We’re thrilled to double down on our roadmap and reach even more families on our mission to empower parents to raise a generation of financially-smart kids. Full press release below.

Greenlight Raises $54 Million to Empower Parents to Raise Financially-Smart Kids

ATLANTA, September 16, 2019 – Greenlight Financial Technology, Inc. (“Greenlight®”), the fintech company on a mission to empower parents to raise a generation of financially-smart kids, announced today it has raised $54 million in Series B funding led by Drive Capital with participation from JPMorgan Chase and Wells Fargo. Existing investors TTV Capital, Live Oak Bank and Relay Ventures also participated. The investment will fuel continued growth and accelerate the company’s development roadmap.

“Greenlight has built an incredible platform that makes it convenient and safe for parents and kids to manage their money. We’re proud to support their growth and help them on their mission,” said Chris Olsen, Partner at Drive Capital who has joined the Greenlight Board. “What attracted us to Greenlight is the scarcity of tech platforms empowering consumers to be more financially successful.”

Greenlight offers a debit card for kids that parents manage through the Greenlight app using flexible parental controls. The company has experienced rapid growth since launching its product in 2017, helping more than half-a-million parents and kids manage daily family finances. 

The Greenlight product allows parents to choose the exact stores where their children can spend, manage chores and allowances, set parent-paid interest rates on savings and more. Kids monitor balances, create saving goals and learn to make real world trade-off decisions.

“At Wells Fargo, financial literacy and helping our clients succeed is a part of our core values,” said C. Thomas Richardson, head of Strategic Partnership Investing at Wells Fargo. “Greenlight offers parents an opportunity to build that core competency of financial literacy in their child’s formative years, through its innovative, interactive and fully digitized product offering. We are impressed by Greenlight’s rapid growth, and we are excited to help fuel the next phase of its development.”

The Series B funding will accelerate Greenlight’s mission-driven roadmap to weave more educational layers into the app experience along with investing, to get kids familiar with the tools to build long-term wealth.

“We’re thrilled to partner with our Series B investors to bring Greenlight to millions of new families and help parents prepare their children for healthy financial futures,” said Tim Sheehan, CEO and Co-Founder of Greenlight. “In the near future, I hope that this generation of kids grow up to spend wisely, learn the importance of saving and feel confident investing to build wealth over the long-term.”

For more information on Greenlight, please visit greenlightcard.com, or follow Greenlight on Facebook and Instagram.

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About Greenlight:

Founded in 2014, Greenlight Financial Technology is an Atlanta-based fintech company that’s committed to empowering parents to raise financially-smart kids. Its groundbreaking family finance product, Greenlight®, is a debit card for kids that parents manage by app using flexible parental controls. Patent-pending technology enables parents to choose the exact stores where their children can spend, manage chores, set parent-paid interest rates on savings and more. Kids monitor balances, create saving goals and learn to make real world trade-off decisions.

The Greenlight Card is issued by Community Federal Savings Bank, member FDIC, pursuant to license by MasterCard International. For more information, please visit: greenlightcard.com.